(+) Organizers

Gulf Coast Campus

Southwest Campus

  • Jennie Harvey - Program Manager (Contact, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA)
  • Bill Hlavacek -  Scientific Organizer (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA)
  • Mara Steinkamp -  Scientific Organizer (University of New Mexico School of Medicine, NM, USA)
(+) Stochastic Cell Regulation (Gulf Coast Campus)

Lecturers teaching this course include:

(+) Cancer Dynamics (Gulf Coast Campus)

Lecturers teaching this course include:

(+) Cell Signaling and Rule-Based Modeling (Southwest Campus)

Lecturers teaching this course include:

  • James R. Faeder (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine)
  • William S. Hlavacek (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
  • Yen Ting Lin (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
(+) Membrane Biology (Southwest Campus)

Braun.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

About Rosemary Braun 

About Rosemary Braun 

Rosemary Braun is a computational biologist with an interest in the development of methods for integrative, systems-level analysis of high-dimensional ("big") *omic data. These methods incorporate bioinformatic information with experimental data to characterize the networks of interactions that lead to the emergence of complex phenotypes, particularly cancers.  Dr. Braun is an Assistant Professor of Biostatistics (Feinberg School of Medicine) and Engineering Sciences & Applied Mathematics at Northwestern University.

Dobelman.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About John Dobelman 

About John Dobelman 

John A. Dobelman, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Practice in Statistics and Director of the statistics Professional Master's Program at Rice University. He has a strong background in engineering and leadership. Prior to joining the faculty at Rice University, he was in the Science and Research (S&R) department at PROS Revenue Management as a pricing scientist. Before PROS he owned and operated a financial engineering laboratory. He has been an Adjunct Professor at The University of St. Thomas, Cameron School of Business, Research Analyst at Rice, and consultant. Prior to his statistics career, he was lead engineer and manager for engineering, program management and implementation engineering/installation for terminal Air Traffic Control communications, surveillance, and navigation and landing systems for the Federal Aviation Administration's Facilities & Equipment program. John earned his Ph.D. in Statistics from Rice University. He completed his MBPM from the Jones Graduate School of Management in public management, entrepreneurship and international business. He did his undergraduate studies in Electrical Engineering at Rice University.

Kimmel.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Marek Kimmel 

About Marek Kimmel 

Marek Kimmel is a Professor of Statistics and Bioengineering at Rice University, in Houston, TX, USA, where he is one of the founding Members of the Steering Committee of the Program in Systems Biology. His main focus is mathematical modeling in biology, mainly in cancer research, genetics, and evolution, including stochastic and deterministic models. His monograph, with David Axelrod, Branching Processes in Biology (in second edition) is a popular reference. He has been collaborating with biologists and physicians. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, cited for his works in estimating progression and early detection of lung cancer. He authored several monographs, around 250 refereed papers, and received research funding from NIH, NSF, EPSRC (UK), NATO, NCN (Poland), and ERC. He supervised around 30 PhD theses in the USA and Poland. He established the Cancer Dynamics track at the annual q-bio Summer Schools. His current focus is application of mathematical genetics and branching process methods to understand and predict cancer progression and interactions between cancer and treatment.

Levine.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

Lipniacki.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

About Tomasz Lipniacki

About Tomasz Lipniacki

Dr. Tomasz Lipniacki is a professor and head of the department in the Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated from Department of Physics,  Warsaw University. Dr. Lipniacki works on cellular regulatory pathways governing responses to stress.  His lab combines stochastic modeling with single cell experiments aiming to elucidate cellular decision making in innate immune signaling. He analyzes how feedbacks and other nonlinear regulatory elements in noisy environments turn information into decision.

Munsky.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Brian Munsky 

About Brian Munsky 

Dr. Munsky joined the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the School of Biomedical Engineering as an assistant professor in January of 2014. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University in 2000 and 2002, respectively, and his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2008. Following his graduate studies, Dr. Munsky worked at the Los Alamos National Laboratory — as a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellow (2008-2010), as a Richard P. Feynman Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Theory and Computing (2010-2013), and as a Staff Scientist (2013). Dr. Munsky is best known for his discovery of Finite State Projection algorithm, which has enabled the efficient study of probability distribution dynamics for stochastic gene regulatory networks. Dr. Munsky’s research interests at CSU are in the integration of stochastic models with single-cell experiments to identify predictive models of gene regulatory systems. He was the recipient of the 2008 UCSB Department of Mechanical Engineering best Ph.D. Dissertation award, the 2010 Leon Heller Postdoctoral Publication Prize and the 2012 LANL Postdoc Distinguished Performance Award for his work in this topic. Dr. Munsky is the contact organizer of the internationally recognized, NIH-funded q-bio summer school, where he runs single-cell stochastic gene regulation (q-bio.org). Dr. Munsky is very excited about the future of quantitative biology, and he would love to talk about this with you!

Jilkine.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Alexandra Jilkine

About Alexandra Jilkine

Alexandra Jilkine is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied and Copmutational Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Notre Dame. Prof. Jilkine is a mathematical biologist, and her research interests include: mathematical modelling of cell lineages and optimal division patterns for delaying cancer, modeling feedbacks governing stem cell renewal and differentiation, and spatiotemporal behaviour of biochemical circuits.

King.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Katherine King

About Katherine King

Katherine Y. King MD PhD is an Assistant Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Baylor College of Medicine, where she is also part of the faculty for the Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Center and the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy. She received her MD and PhD degrees from Washington University in St. Louis in 2003 before completing her residency and fellowship training at Baylor College of Medicine where she has been on faculty since 2012. Dr. King has been the recipient of the March of Dimes Basil O’Connor Starter Scholar Award and the Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation Liviya Anderson Award. In her mission to alleviate deaths from infectious diseases, her current research focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which inflammation damages blood and immune cell production by hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. When she is not seeing patients at Texas Children’s Hospital or conducting research in the lab, Dr. King enjoys running, yoga, and volunteering her time for health care advocacy through the group Doctors for Change.

McDonald.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Thomas "Ollie" McDonald

About Thomas \"Ollie\" McDonald

Thomas "Ollie" McDonald, is the Associate Director of the Center for Cancer Evolution in the Department of Biostastistics and Computational Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a Research Associate at T.H. Chan Harvard School of Public Health (cce.dfci.harvard.edu). Ollie obtained his PhD in Statistics at Rice University in 2015 under the direction of Professor Marek Kimmel. He spent time in Franziska Michor’s lab at T.H. Chan Harvard School of Public Health before assuming his new position in the CCE. His main research interest is mathematical modeling of tumor evolution and heterogeneity in cancers with particular emphasis on branching process models. His current work includes creating an optimal dose scheduling software package for administration of targeted drugs. 

Plon.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

About Sharon Plon

About Sharon Plon

Dr. Plon is a board-certified medical geneticist and laboratory scientist with a longstanding focus on the field of cancer genetics and clinical genomics. Her translational research has focused on analysis of patients with inherited susceptibility to childhood cancer. Dr. Plon co-chaired the international IARC committee which made recommendations for appropriate classification and clinical reporting of genetic variants in cancer susceptibility genes.  Dr. Plon is a principal investigator one of the NHGRI/NCI clinical sequencing evidence generation research (CSER2) project at BCM. In 2013, Dr. Plon was name co-Principal investigator of an NHGRI U01 grant to support the development of a comprehensive Clinical Genomics (ClinGen) Resource.  She also co-chairs the germline reporting committee of the Children’s Oncology Group/NCI Pediatric MATCH national precision oncology trial which opened in August 2017. Dr. Plon serves on the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research of the NIH and is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Society of Human Genetics.

Presse.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Steve Presse 

About Steve Presse 

Steve went to McGill as an undergrad in Chemistry (2000-2003). He did his graduate work under the guidance of Bob Silbey at MIT in the area of Chemical Physics (2003-2008). He later turned to Biophysics for his postdoc with Ken Dill at UCSF (2008-2013). Steve’s research as Assistant Professor of Physics at IUPUI focused on statistical mechanical models of biological systems in addition to questions of inference and data analysis (2013-2016). Most recently, as Associate Professor of Physics and Chemistry at ASU (2017-), Steve is working in methods of nonparametric Bayesian analysis and has continued fluorescence experiments begun at IUPUI aimed at understanding bacterial predator-prey dynamics.

Savageau.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Michael Savageau

About Michael Savageau

Michael Savageau is a Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics and Biomedical Engineering at The University of California Davis. He earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University (Ph.D.), and was a postdoctoral fellow at both UCLA and Stanford University prior to joining the faculty at The University of Michigan. Dr. Savageau initiated Michigan’s interdisciplinary training program in Cellular Biotechnology and its interdisciplinary Bioinformatics Program. He also chaired the Department of Microbiology & Immunology from 1992-2002 and was named the Nicolas Rashevsky Distinguished University Professor in 2002. After moving to the University of California Davis in 2003 he chaired the Department of Biomedical Engineering from 2003 to 2005. His honors include Guggenheim Fellow, Fulbright Senior Research Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering Fellow, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Fellow, Moore Distinguished Scholar at the California Institute of Technology, Invited Scholar at the Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, 79th Josiah Willard Gibbs Lecturer for the American Mathematical Society, Stanislaw Ulam Distinguished Scholar Award from the Center for Non-Linear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Member of the US National Academy of Medicine, Honorary Doctor of Science, Universitat de Lleida, Spain, and The Michael A. Savageau Collegiate Professorship in Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics permanently endowed by the University of Michigan. He was Editor-in-Chief of Mathematical Biosciences from 1995 to 2005, and serves on advisory panels for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Keck Foundation, and the National Academies of Science. He lectures extensively in the US and abroad on his research, which is focused on biochemical systems theory with an emphasis on function, design and evolution of metabolic networks, signaling cascades, and gene circuitry.

Shepherd.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Douglas Shepherd

About Douglas Shepherd

Dr. Shepherd is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Physics and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Denver. He received his B.S. in Physics from University of California Santa Barbara in 2003 and his Ph.D. in Physics from Colorado State University in 2011. He was a postdoctoral scholar at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 2011-2013 in the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies and Center for Nonlinear Studies. His interests are in developing and applying new fluorescent microscopy techniques, data processing algorithms, and statistical modeling tools to study single-cell heterogeneity in cellular decision-making processes. He has been involved in the q-Bio Summer School since 2011, including starting the Membrane Dynamics track and serving as co-organizer for the Single Cell Gene Regulation track.

Tavare.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Simon Tavaré

About Simon Tavaré

Simon Tavaré is a Professor in the University of Cambridge Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and its Department of Oncology. Until end of January 2018, he was the Director of the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, now part of the University of Cambridge. Simon’s research interests include statistical bioinformatics, computational biology, evolutionary approaches to cancer, statistics and stochastic computation. Simon received his BSc, MSc and PhD in probability and statistics from the University of Sheffield, UK. He spent 25 years in academia in the USA, where his research was funded by the NSF and the NIH. He moved to Cambridge in 2004. He has supervised some 35 postdoctoral fellows and 40 PhD students. His research has led to his election as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (FMedSci) in 2009, a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 2011 and a member of EMBO in 2015. He is currently Director of the Wellcome Trust PhD programme in Mathematical Genomics and Medicine. He gave the American Mathematical Society’s Einstein Public Lecture in Mathematics, entitled “Cancer by the numbers”, in 2015 and was an invited speaker at ICIAM2015 in Beijing. He was, until recently, President of the London Mathematical Society.

(+) Organizers

Gulf Coast Campus

Southwest Campus

  • Jennie Harvey - Program Manager (Contact, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA)
  • Bill Hlavacek -  Scientific Organizer (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA)
  • Mara Steinkamp -  Scientific Organizer (University of New Mexico School of Medicine, NM, USA)
(+) Stochastic Cell Regulation (Gulf Coast Campus)

Lecturers teaching this course include:

(+) Cancer Dynamics (Gulf Coast Campus)

Lecturers teaching this course include:

(+) Cell Signaling (Southwest Campus)

Lecturers teaching this course include:

  • Yen Ting Lin (Los Alamos National Lab)