q-bio Conference (2018)

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Organizing Committees

(+) Local Organizing Committee

To learn more about each committee member, please click on their name.

(+) Program Committee

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  • Lingchong You (Chair), Duke - 2019, (Email)
  • David Schwab (Outgoing Chair), Northwestern - 2018
  • Anne-Florence Bitbol, CNRS/UPMC - 2019
  • Alejandro Colman-Lerner (2018), U. Buenos-Aires - 2018
  • Michael Deem, Rice - 2019
  • Jeff Gore, MIT - 2018
  • Sidhartha Goyal, U. Toronto - 2018
  • Oleg Igoshin, Rice University 
  • Elena Koslover, UCSD - 2019
  • Robin Lee, U. Pittsburgh - 2019
  • Carlos Lopez, Vanderbilt - 2018
  • Alexandre Morozov, Rutgers University - 2019
  • Chris Rao, UIUC - 2019
  • Doug Shepherd, U. Colorado-Denver - 2019
  • Wenying Shou, Fred Hutch - 2019
  • Mara Steinkamp, U. New Mexico - 2019
  • Eduardo Sontag, Rutgers University - 2019
(+) Board of Directors

To learn more about board member, please click on their name.

Igoshin.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Oleg Igoshin 

About Oleg Igoshin 

Oleg Igoshin is an Associate Professor at the Department of Bioengineering and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics at Rice University. He received his BSc in Physics from Novosibirsk State University (Russia) in 1998, M.SC in Chemical Physics from Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel) in 2000 and his PhD in Physics from UC Berkeley in 2004. During his PhD, he was working on the mechanisms of patent formation and motility in bacterial colonies in the group of George Oster. In 2004-2006, he was a postdoctoral fellow at UC Davis working on systems biology and non-linear dynamics of biochemical networks. He joined Rice University as an Assistant Professor in 2007 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2013. In 2011 he was a received a Premium Award in Systems Biology from Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET). Dr. Igoshin coauthored over 60 publications and currently serves as an Associate Editor for PLOS Computational Biology. His research involves multiple interdisciplinary projects in the area of Computational Systems Biology. Using methods of nonlinear dynamics, biophysics, statistics and bioinformatics, his group aims to understand the design and behavior of biochemical networks and principles of multicellular self-organization. They closely collaborate with experimental researchers to verify their models and theories.

Bitbol.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Anne-Florence Bitbol 

About Anne-Florence Bitbol 

I am a theorist broadly interested in quantitative biology and biophysics. I hold a CNRS Researcher position at Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC) in Paris. I am currently mainly working on inferring protein-protein interactions from sequence data, and on modeling the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Previously, I was a postdoc in the Biophysics Theory group at Princeton University, where I worked on multi-protein complexes, and on evolution in rugged fitness landscapes. For my PhD, at Universite Paris-Diderot, I studied the statistics and dynamics of complex membranes.

Deem.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

 

About Michael Deem 

About Michael Deem 

Deem has developed methods to quantify vaccine effectiveness and antigenic distance for influenza, methods to sculpt the immune system to mitigate immunodominance in dengue fever, a physical theory of the competition that allows HIV to escape from the immune system, the first exact solution of a mathematical model of evolution that accounts for cross-species genetic exchange, a hierarchical approach to protein molecular evolution, a 'thermodynamic'formulation of evolution, and a theory for how biological modularity spontaneously arises in an evolving system. The adaptive immune response to viruses and vaccines is studied with a variety of random energy models. Field theories are used to analyze physical theories of evolution.

Faeder.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Jim Faeder

About Jim Faeder

James R. Faeder is Associate Professor of Computational and Systems Biology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Co-Director of the Join Carnegie Mellon--University of Pittsburgh PhD Program in Computational Biology. His research focuses on computational modeling of cell regulatory networks, combining development of novel methodologies with applications to specific systems of biological and biomedical relevance, including the immune system and cancer. For more see https://www.csb.pitt.edu/Faculty/Faeder/.

Goyal.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Sidhartha Goyal 

About Sidhartha Goyal 

Sidhartha Goyal got his PhD in Physics at Princeton in 2009 and then moved to  KITP, UC Santa Barbara for a postdoc, he got his first degree in Electrical Engineering from IIT Bombay.  Since 2014, he is an Assistant Professor in the Physics Department at University of Toronto’s downtown (St. George) campus working on understanding dynamics of large heterogenous populations from microbes to stem cells.

Hlavacek.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Bill Hlavacek

About Bill Hlavacek

Bill Hlavacek is a Scientist in the Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which is one of six Groups in the Laboratory's Theoretical Division. He is also affiliated with the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico and the University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center. His scientific training was with Michael A. Savageau, Alan S. Perelson, and Byron Goldstein. His main research interests concern mathematical modeling of cellular regulatory systems, especially cell signaling networks involved in cancer and/or immunity. He has serious interests in developing advanced methods and software tools to support modeling, such as BioNetGen and BioNetFit. Dr. Hlavacek regularly lectures in the q-bio Summer School and he is one of the founding organizers of both the school and the affiliated Annual q-bio Conference. He is proudly one of the (less important) Editors of Quantitative Biology: Theory, Computational Methods and Examples of Models, a collection of contributed didactic chapters covering topics taught at the q-bio Summer School. The book, to be published by The MIT Press in 2018, includes contributions from many former q-bio Summer School students. On a scale from A to 10, he considers himself very satisfied.

Kolomeisky.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

About Anatoly Kolomeisky 

About Anatoly Kolomeisky 

Anatoly B. Kolomeisky is Professor of Chemistry and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice University in Houston, Texas.  He is also a Primary Investigator in the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.  In 1991, after his undergraduate study at Chemistry Department of Moscow State University in Russia he came to USA to continue his education. In 1998 he graduated with PhD in Chemistry from Cornell University, working with Prof. Ben Widom. It was followed by a postdoctoral research at University of Maryland at College Park with Prof. Michael E. Fisher (1998-2000). Dr. Kolomeisky came to Department of Chemistry at Rice University in Houston, TX, in 2000. Since then he rose to the ranks of Full Professor of Chemistry, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. His research fields are Theoretical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Theoretical Biophysics and Statistical Mechanics.  He is an author of more than170 papers, 4 book chapters and one book.  Prof. Anatoly Kolomeisky is a recipient of multiple awards, including the Dreyfus New Faculty Award, NSF CAREER Award, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the Hamill Innovation Award, the Humboldt Research Fellowship, and he is also a Fellow of American Physical Society.  Prof. Kolomeisky is a member of the Editorial Board of several scientific journals including Biophysical Journal.

Lee.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

About Robin Lee 

About Robin Lee 

Robin E. C. Lee is an Assistant Professor of Computational and Systems Biology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. His lab uses live-cell imaging, microfluidics and mathematical models to study how cells use networks of interacting molecules to process information and make cell fate decisions. Other areas of research include computer vision, parameter estimation, and transcriptional regulation.

Levine.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

Munsky.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Brian Munsky

About Brian Munsky

Dr. Munsky joined the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the School of Biomedical Engineering as an assistant professor in January of 2014. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University in 2000 and 2002, respectively, and his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2008. Following his graduate studies, Dr. Munsky worked at the Los Alamos National Laboratory — as a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellow (2008-2010), as a Richard P. Feynman Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Theory and Computing (2010-2013), and as a Staff Scientist (2013). Dr. Munsky is best known for his discovery of Finite State Projection algorithm, which has enabled the efficient study of probability distribution dynamics for stochastic gene regulatory networks. Dr. Munsky’s research interests at CSU are in the integration of stochastic models with single-cell experiments to identify predictive models of gene regulatory systems. He was the recipient of the 2008 UCSB Department of Mechanical Engineering best Ph.D. Dissertation award, the 2010 Leon Heller Postdoctoral Publication Prize and the 2012 LANL Postdoc Distinguished Performance Award for his work in this topic. Dr. Munsky is the contact organizer of the internationally recognized, NIH-funded q-bio summer school, where he runs single-cell stochastic gene regulation (q-bio.org). Dr. Munsky is very excited about the future of quantitative biology, and he would love to talk about this with you!

Nemenman.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Ilya Nemenman

About Ilya Nemenman

Ilya Nemenman has received his PhD in Physics from Princeton. He did additional training at UCSB and Columbia University. After working as a Technical Staff Member at Los Alamos National Laboratory, he moved to Emory University, where he is currently the Winship Distinguished Research Professor of Physics and Biology. He has served as the Chair of the Division of Biological Physics of the American Physical Society and was a founding organizer of the q-bio Conference and Summer School. His group works on information processing in biological systems across different scales. 

Resnekov.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Orna Resnekov

About Orna Resnekov

Orna Resnekov did her Ph.D. at the Weizmann Institute of Science studying transcription termination in DNA viruses. She did an EMBO-funded postdoc on RNA stability at the Karolinska Institute, and then went to Harvard University as a Bunting Fellow (and subsequently the NIH) to study development in Bacillus subtilis. Orna moved to the Molecular Sciences Institute to study information transmission in cellular signaling systems via the post-translational modification of signaling proteins [MSI was an early supporter of the q-bio Conference], she is currently studying the engineering and evolution of allosteric regulation in proteins, as an independent scientist.

Shepherd.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Douglas Shepherd 

About Douglas Shepherd 

Dr. Shepherd is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Physics and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Denver. He received his B.S. in Physics from University of California Santa Barbara in 2003 and his Ph.D. in Physics from Colorado State University in 2011. He was a postdoctoral scholar at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 2011-2013 in the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies and Center for Nonlinear Studies. His interests are in developing and applying new fluorescent microscopy techniques, data processing algorithms, and statistical modeling tools to study single-cell heterogeneity in cellular decision-making processes. He has been involved in the q-Bio Summer School since 2011, including starting the Membrane Dynamics track and serving as co-organizer for the Single Cell Gene Regulation track.

Shou.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

About Wenying Shou 

About Wenying Shou 

Wenying Shou's group aims to quantitatively understand evolutionary and ecological processes in multi-species microbial communities, combining experiments with mathematical models.

Steinkamp.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

About Mara Steinkamp 

About Mara Steinkamp 

My research interests lie in understanding how complex ErbB receptor interactions promote cell growth and survival in cancer. Since ErbB receptors are frequently expressed in ovarian cancer, we are testing the efficacy of anti-ErbB therapies for ovarian cancer treatment. Successful collaborations with clinicians and mathematical modelers through the UNM Spatiotemporal Modeling Center have been instrumental to my research.  Modeling of ErbB receptor interactions on the cell membrane using a spatial stochastic model has revealed how heterodimerization influences activation of Erbb2 and ErbB3.  3D ovarian cancer spheroid simulations have been used to optimize drug delivery to peritoneal ovarian tumors. These interdisciplinary teams energize our preclinical studies by deepening our understanding of ovarian cancer metastatic spread and informs our search for novel treatments against this disease.

Walczak.

Brian Munsky

 

 

 

 

About Aleksandra Walczak

About Aleksandra Walczak

Aleksandra Walczak received her PhD in physics at the University of California, San Diego, working on models of stochastic gene expression. After a graduate fellowship at KITP, she was a Princeton Center for Theoretical Science Fellow, focusing on applying information theory to signal processing in small gene regulatory networks. Currently she is a CNRS research director at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, interested in the effects of selection on population genealogies, collective behavior of bird flocks and statistical descriptions of the immune system.

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